Home >> Tag Archives: Immunohistochemistry —

Tag Archives: Immunohistochemistry —

Hepatic neoplasms—cases, challenges, cautions

July 2017—Kisha Mitchell Richards, MBBS, once took a picture of the ocean as she went around a bend in the road traveling from Negril to Montego Bay in Jamaica. She showed that photo in the second half of a CAP16 session to prepare the audience to shift gears, as she put it, from the first speaker’s talk on medical liver disease (see “Liver injury patterns: pitfalls and pointers,” March 2017) to hers on hepatic neoplasms. “So for me, we are about to go around a bend to things of sheer beauty,” she said, referring to immunohistochemistry stains in the neoplastic liver. “Unfortunately, that which is beautiful to the pathologist is not often great for the patient. That’s our usual practice,” said Dr. Richards, a pathologist at Greenwich Hospital, Yale New Haven Health, Greenwich, Conn.

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PD-L1, other targeted therapies await more standardized IHC

February 2016—Immunohistochemistry is heading down a path toward more standardization, and that’s essential as it plays an increasing role in rapidly expanding immunotherapy, says David L. Rimm, MD, PhD, professor of pathology and of medicine (oncology) and director of translational pathology at Yale University School of Medicine. As a co-presenter of a webinar produced by CAP TODAY in collaboration with Horizon Diagnostics, titled “Immunohistochemistry Through the Lens of Companion Diagnostics” (http://j.mp/ihclens_webinar), he analyzes the core challenges of IHC’s adaptation to the needs of precision medicine: binary versus continuous IHC, measuring as opposed to counting or viewing by the pathologist, automation, and assay performance versus protein measurement.

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Rebooting IHC for companion diagnostics

January 2016—Immunotherapy has taken cancer treatment by storm. And given the number of proteins that are targets for immunotherapy and other targeted therapies, immunohistochemistry should theoretically be the ideal method for classifying patients as responders versus non-responders. But there are several reasons why IHC hasn’t reached this status within personalized medicine, says Clive R. Taylor, MD, DPhil, professor of pathology in the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California.

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