Home >> Tag Archives: Diagnostic assays/markers/tests/test kits (See also Screening tests) — (page 2)

Tag Archives: Diagnostic assays/markers/tests/test kits (See also Screening tests) —

HbA1c in CVD treatment: farewell to one size fits all

March 2017—Anchor. Central pillar. Cornerstone. It would be hard to find a weighty synonym for “linchpin” that hasn’t been used to describe HbA1c’s role in diabetes diagnosis and management since 2010, when the assay was recognized by key standard-setting organizations as the equal of fasting glucose and oral glucose tolerance testing in diabetes and prediabetes testing.

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Latest TB testing guide set forth by ATS, CDC, IDSA

March 2017—Testing for latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection and active tuberculosis disease remained relatively unchanged for many years. Screening for latent infection depended on an initial positive tuberculin skin test, and evidence for active TB required a positive culture for M. tuberculosis complex. New tests altered this picture in the past five years. For diagnosis of latent infection, interferon-gamma release assays have taken a major role. And nucleic acid amplification testing is becoming a mainstay for establishing a diagnosis of TB.

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One bug or prix fixe? Respiratory pathogen testers weigh in

February 2017—With the number of rapid, accurate molecular assays for respiratory pathogens growing, microbiology laboratories have more options than ever. They include, among others, Meridian Bioscience’s Illumigene assays for group A Streptococcus and pertussis and its newest assay, Mycoplasma Direct, as well as Alere’s assays for influenza A/B, respiratory syncytial virus, and Streptococcus on its i molecular platform. No longer are laboratories limited to inaccurate rapid antigen tests, weeks-long culture, or multi-pathogen panels.

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With metagenomic sequencing, no pathogen can hide

January 2017—Detecting pathogenic organisms with PCR has become a staple of the clinical microbiology laboratory, so much so that it seems like it has always been there. A more advanced molecular technique—unbiased metagenomic next-generation sequencing—will increasingly become a part of infectious disease diagnosis because it has several advantages over PCR. While it will be demanding to perform at first, it, too, may become a standard method in the clinical microbiology laboratory.

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Procalcitonin passes automation hurdle

December 2016—Matt Damon in Interstellar. Julia Roberts in The Player. Gene Hackman in Young Frankenstein. When movie stars appear in uncredited parts, it’s usually for a cameo, not a leading role. But in diagnostics, an uncredited or off-label use of an assay might be its main use—possibly even its most clinically important use.

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Labs enter a MALDI-TOF state of mind

October 2016—When MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enters the microbiology lab, it’s a little like watching Sir John Falstaff settle his considerable girth onstage. Things happen. Characters fret and flee, scheme, opine, panic, and, in the case of Prince Hal, ascend to greatness. (And, if we’re honest, some just get drunk.) Both, in brief, are an upending presence.

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Yale researchers dig for new kidney biomarkers

October 2016—An automated immunoassay has been created for symmetric dimethylarginine, or SDMA, a biomarker that can detect chronic kidney disease between 10 to 17 months earlier than creatinine, with 100 percent sensitivity and 91 percent specificity. And, unlike with creatinine, a patient’s muscle mass does not influence the biomarker’s reliability.

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