Home >> Tag Archives: Breast cancer/breast health —

Tag Archives: Breast cancer/breast health —

LCIS variants and DCIS: tips on telling them apart

April 2018—DCIS or LCIS? Making the distinction can be difficult in some cases. Stuart J. Schnitt, MD, in a session at CAP17 on ancillary testing in breast pathology, delineated the reasons and provided tips, including the role of E-cadherin immunostains to help in this distinction. The cells of DCIS typically show strong membrane staining for E-cadherin while the cells of LCIS are typically E-cadherin negative. But among the tips: If an in situ lesion is E-cadherin positive, it doesn’t automatically mean it’s ductal carcinoma in situ. As he demonstrated in several cases, the lesion could be lobular carcinoma in situ with aberrant E-cadherin immunostaining.

Read More »

Breast cancer answers, short and long

February 2014—When it comes to breast cancer, medical oncologists have two “wish lists” for their pathologist colleagues. Here’s the short list of test results they need when they sit down with a patient, courtesy of Melody Cobleigh, MD. “ER, PR, HER2,” says Dr. Cobleigh, professor of medicine and the Brian Piccolo Chair for Cancer Research, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago. It’s a direct, unassailable answer. But so, too, is saying that the assassination of the Archduke Ferdinand caused World War I.

Read More »

HPV a game changer in head, neck tumors

December 2013—Not that any cancer is ever “easy,” but until relatively recently, the culprit in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas was clear. The vast majority were caused by “smoking, smoking, and smoking,” says William Westra, MD, professor of pathology, oncology, and otolaryngology/head and neck surgery, and associate director, surgical pathology, The Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions. Call this HNSCC’s antediluvian era.

Read More »

New guideline takes on tough HER2 cases

October 2013—In HER2 testing for breast cancer, the term “equivocal” verges on being a four-letter word. If the patient has a clearly positive test result, therapies targeting HER2 become a treatment option, and a highly successful one at that. If the result is clearly negative, HER2-targeting drugs are off the table; the patient isn’t expected to benefit from the drugs, which are expensive and can be cardiotoxic.

Read More »
X